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The Chinese property bubble was a real estate bubble in residential and/or commercial real estate in the People’s Republic of China. The phenomenon has seen average housing prices in the country triple from 2005 to 2009, possibly driven by both government policies and Chinese cultural attitudes.[4] High price-to-income and price-to-rent ratios for property and the high number of unoccupied residential and commercial units have been held up as evidence of a bubble. Critics of the bubble theory point to China’s relatively conservative mortgage lending standards and trends of increasing urbanization and rising incomes as proof that property prices can remain supported.
2011 estimates by property analysts state that there are some 64 million empty properties and apartments in China and that housing development in China is massively oversupplied and overvalued, and is a bubble waiting to burst with serious consequences in the future.[7] The BBC cites Ordos in Inner Mongolia as the largest ghost town in China, full of empty shopping malls and apartment complexes.[8] A large, and largely uninhabited urban real estate development has been constructed 25 km from Dongsheng District in the Kangbashi New Area. Intended to house a million people, it remains largely uninhabited.[9][10] Intended to have 300,000 residents by 2010, government figures stated it had 28,000.[11]

Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State
Google Real State

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