New Orleans Real Estate

New Orleans Real Estate Detail
In the law regulating historic districts in the United States, a contributing resource or contributing property is any building, structure, or object which adds to the historical integrity or architectural qualities that make the historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. Government agencies, at the state, national, and local level in the United States, have differing definitions of what constitutes a contributing property but there are common characteristics. Local laws often regulate the changes that can be made to contributing structures within designated historic districts. The first local ordinances dealing with the alteration of buildings within historic districts was in Charleston, South Carolina in 1931.[1]
According to the National Park Service, the first instance of law dealing with contributing properties in local historic districts occurred in 1931 when the city of Charleston, South Carolina, enacted an ordinance which designated the “Old and Historic District.”[1] The ordinance declared that buildings in the district could not have changes made to their architectural features visible from the street. By the mid 1930s, other U.S. cities followed Charleston’s lead. An amendment to the Louisiana Constitution led to the creation of the Vieux Carre Commission in 1937.[1] The commission was charged with protecting and preserving the French Quarter in the city of New Orleans. The city then passed a local ordinance which set standards regulating changes within the quarter.[1] Other sources, such as the Columbia Law Review in 1963, indicate differing dates for the preservation ordinances in both Charleston and New Orleans.

New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate
New Orleans Real Estate

You may also like...