Vermont Real Estate

Vermont Real Estate Detail
The term Vermont Republic has been used by later historians[1] for the government of what became modern Vermont from 1777 to 1791. In July 1777, delegates from 28 towns met and declared independence from jurisdictions and land claims of British colonies in New Hampshire and New York. They also abolished slavery within their boundaries. The people of Vermont took part in the American Revolution and considered themselves Americans, even if Congress did not recognize the jurisdiction.[2] Because of vehement objections from New York, which had conflicting property claims, the Continental Congress declined to recognize Vermont, then called the New Hampshire Grants. Vermont’s overtures to join the British Province of Quebec failed.[3] In 1791, Vermont was admitted to the United States as the 14th state.
Vermont did not send or receive diplomats, but it coined a currency called Vermont coppers from a mint operated by Reuben Harmon in East Rupert (1785–1788),[4] and operated a postal system. While the Vermont coppers bore the legend Vermontis. Res. Publica (Latin for republic or state), the constitution and other official documents used the term “State of Vermont”. It referred to its chief executive as a “governor”. The 1777 constitution refers to Vermont both as “the State of Vermont”, as in the third paragraph of the preamble, and in the preamble’s last paragraph, the constitution refers to itself as “the Constitution of the Commonwealth”.[5]

Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate
Vermont Real Estate

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